All About Pink Diamonds

Natural Fancy Pink Diamond

Natural Fancy Pink Diamond

Natural Fancy Coloured Pink Diamonds are amongst the most beautiful, rare and eagerly sought after coloured gems in the world. These elusive gems make rare appearances on the open market and The Argyle Mine in Australia is the world’s foremost source of the vast majority of Natural Pink diamonds mined today, but even then only a small handful of these diamonds are of gem quality.

Beautiful, Rare and Eagerly Sought After

Other notable countries include South Africa, Brazil, Borno and India. Pink diamonds are expensive because they are so scarce, if you’re interested in Pink Diamond Engagement Rings with a Natural pink diamond be prepared to budget at least five figures!
Deciding to buy a pink diamond requires much thought and deliberation, with one of the most critical issue being simply a matter of budget. This is because pink diamonds increase in price exponentially as their size and colour intensity grows. You will need to have a clear picture of what you intend to spend.

At Daniel Prince we have access to one of the UK’s largest inventories of Loose Pink Diamonds so contact us to discuss your requirements in confidence and we can advise you on what you can expect for your budget. Be realistic about your expectations though, even small stones can be $50k per carat!

Unlike white diamonds which exist in relatively large quantities, natural pink diamonds constitute less than 1% of the total quantity of rough diamonds manufactured annually, and this quantity is steadily shrinking. To put it into context, during the entire annual production of 2010 at the Argyle mine, just 55 (fifty-five) pink diamonds over half a carat were made avaialble at the annual auction.

Pink Cushion Diamond

Pink Cushion Diamond

Some diamonds are enhanced to give them their fancy colour. Certain types of brown diamond can be irradiated to produce fancy pink colours. Pink diamonds that have been coloured by irradiation are inexpensive compared to natural pink diamonds because they are not so rare. Most pink diamonds mined are faint to light coloured (Pastel coloured), common names include: bubble gum, strawberry, raspberry, cotton candy, rose, wine, baby and blossom.

High temperature and non-isotopic stress during diamond formation deforms the crystal lattice and displaces many carbon atoms from their normal positions. Hair like graining is also evident in some of them.

Jennifer Lopez Pink Diamond Ring

Jennifer Lopez Pink Diamond Ring

Natural Pink diamonds have always been exceptionally rare. In the 16th century and for several hundred year, India was the World’s main source of Natural pink diamonds. Recently, a famous light pink Agra diamond was sold at auction for almost $7 million. This stone was documented as being a gift to Babur (first Mogul emperor) from the Rajah of Agra, for sparing his life in 1526. It later belonged to the Duke of Brunswick, the greatest connoisseur of coloured diamonds of the 19th century. In 1725, Brazil produced some light pink diamonds. The Star of Brazil is a 128.80 carat rose coloured gem, which was cut around 1832 in Amsterdam. An Indian gem collector paid 80,000 British pounds for it in the 1860s. It remains in India today. In 1947, Dr. John Williamson discovered a 23.60 pastel pink round diamond in Tanzania.

Pink Diamond Colour Chart

Pink Diamond Colour Chart

It was not until 1979 in Australia that a small vein of pink diamonds was discovered that things really started to get exciting. Instead of being light pink and faint in colour, these new diamonds were a much deeper pink. Australia is now producing about a 100 carats a year however of those the vast majority of gems are under one carat. In 1989, the Australian Argyle Mine sold two Natural Pink Diamonds over 3 carats. It is rumored these stones were sold for $700,000 per carat. You can expect to pay over $100,000 per carat for a 1-carat natural pink, and around $30,000 per carat for smaller stones under 1/2 carat.

The extreme scarcity of gem quality natural pink diamonds has meant that only a privileged few of the ultra wealthy have owned them in the past. It is this rarity, coupled with their natural beauty that has made them a high-demand item at the world’s top jewellery auction houses. In 1994, Christie’s in Geneva sold a 19.66 ct Natural Fancy pink for $377,483 per carat (about $7.4 million). In 1995, Sotheby’s sold a 7.37 ct Fancy Intense purplish pink for $818,863 per carat, or just over $6 million! These are amongst the highest prices ever paid for natural fancy coloured diamonds.

Of course, the rarity of colour affects prices. The pricing of pink and red diamonds is rarely disclosed in public, though it’s not uncommon to be hundreds of thousands of dollars per carat. A 0.95-ct. purplish red diamond was sold at auction in 1987 for close to a million dollars, for example. Pink diamonds gained great interest when Ben Affleck proposed to Jennifer Lopez with a large natural pink diamond. Ever since their engagement, articles about natural pink diamonds have been popping up in the media everywhere. Sadly their relationship wasn’t to last as long as the handmade setting of the diamond!

Some points of interest about Pink Diamonds:-

  • The largest pink diamond in the world is the Darya-i-Nur, or Sea of Light, at 175 carats. The light pink was discovered in 1642 and was part of the crown jewels of India until the invading Persian army took it in 1739. It remains in Iran to this day.
  • The Pink Conde, or Le Grande Conde, is a 9 carat pear-shaped stone given to Louis de Bourbon, Prince of Conde, in 1643 by King Louis 13th of France for war service. The prince put it as the centrepiece of his jewelled walking stick. It was later placed in the French Crown.
  • The Queen received a 23 carat pink diamond as a wedding present in 1947, which she later placed at the centre of a diamond-encrusted brooch.
  • The largest vivid pink diamond, as graded by the GIA is the Steinmetz Pink at 59.6 carats, unveiled in Monaco in 2003.